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Canon Expo 2010
by Allison Johnson -  9/2/2010

The Canon Expo recently took New York by storm, and DCR had an early pre-show look exhibits. We found some new lenses, futuristic prototypes and took a mixed reality tour inside the 5D Mark II. Read on for photos and impressions from the show.

Canon Expo 2010

Canon's new L series telephoto lenses were on display at the show. To demonstrate the reduction in weight from their predecessors, Canon displayed them with small weighted bags making up the difference. While the new lenses are weighty, they are significantly lighter than the comparative weight of the old lenses.

Canon Expo 2010
Canon EF 400mm f/2.8 IS II USM

It's hard to make out under the green light, but the new lenses use a warmer L series white shade.

Canon Expo 2010
Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L II USM

I also took a quick hands-on look at the new PowerShot SD4500, a follow up to the SD4000. The SD4500 packs a 10x optical zoom punch and the same 10 megapixel high-sensitivity CMOS sensor seen in the SD4000.

Canon Expo 2010

The new 8-15mm f/4L USM fisheye zoom lens was on display, rigged up to a 5D. I fired a few shots (none that I was allowed to share) and the effect of the full circle at wide angle on a full frame camera was very impressive. The lens is compact and slightly heavy in the hand.

Canon Expo 2010

Canon Expo 2010

For more details about the new lenses and a few clips from the show floor, take a look at the video below.

I turned another corner in Canon's expo halls and came face to face with on oddly shaped DSLR finished in glossy white. Displayed under glass, it's an early concept camera that's been nicknamed "the wonder camera." It's futuristic looking, for sure. The camera supposedly combines a massive zoom range with full-time video capture.

Canon Expo 2010

Sharing the display case with the wonder camera is a small 3D "personal" camera with two lenses in a sleek, ergonomic form. Behind it, an "image palate," which would in theory allow users to interact with videos and stills through a large touch display.

Canon Expo 2010

Also on display was a massive 300mm CMOS sensor the size of a large dinner plate. It's described as a high-sensitivity imager suitable for an astronomic telescope.

Canon Expo 2010

Around the corner was the smaller but equally impressive 120 million pixel CMOS sensor.

Canon Expo 2010

The sensor is displayed with an ultra-sensitive panorama camera, developed so far as to have a lens mount. The panorama capabilities were demonstrated on a large display next to the exhibit, showing off the camera's impressive resolution and detail reproduction.

Canon Expo 2010

Canon showed off another innovation in the form of a single-shot multi-band camera. The sensor contains six different color filters as opposed to the standard RGB of traditional cameras. According to Canon, its color recognition capabilities are greater than that of the human eye. With a 50 megapixel sensor, it detects certain colors even when the human eye can't see them.

Canon Expo 2010

The so-called "mixed-reality" walk-in of the Canon 5D Mark II was surprisingly interesting. I donned a pair of fashionable glasses and stepped up to a marker on the floor. There was a real 5D sitting in front of me, and a computer model appeared before my eyes, floated upwards and became larger than life. I could look around in any direction, even directly behind me to the front lens element, and effectively look around inside a huge computer model of the 5D's inner workings.

Canon Expo 2010

You definitely won't look cool doing it, but stepping into the 5D through the mixed reality presentation was pretty cool in itself.

The scope of the show is enormous. For those of us who pay most attention to cameras, it's easy to forget that Canon is a company that does many other things besides pump out L series lenses and PowerShot after PowerShot. The Expo is an impressive reminder of how widespread Canon's technologies are.